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New Year's resolutions for your business. A desk with a blank notepad lying on it.

6 New Year’s resolutions for your businesses – and how to stick to them

By | b2b, business advice, editing | No Comments

The new year is an opportunity to make positive changes. That’s why January often brings a surge of gym memberships and diet foods. While it’s great to develop your personal life, shouldn’t you be making New Year’s resolutions for your business too? After all, the end of the year is the perfect time to reflect on your business’ progress over the last 12 months. It’s a chance to evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, set goals, and devise a business development plan. So, we’ve listed six of our favourite New Year’s resolutions for business owners, starting with some quick pointers on how to keep them going when the initial enthusiasm wears off.

Making resolutions that stick

Most people struggle to maintain their New Year’s resolutions beyond February, so here are some tried and tested ways to help you stick to your business goals.

Stay accountable

Make your resolutions public. The expectations of others will add momentum to your business goals, making them more likely to succeed. Also, sharing your goals publicly creates shared accountability and encourages shared ideas – this is important if reaching your goals will require a team effort.

Remind yourself why you’re doing this

Every project and every team will go through tough periods, when reaching your goal seems further away than ever. To combat this, regularly remind yourself and your team WHY you are trying to achieve it. Doing so will keep you focussed and motivated.

Base your ideas in reality

Avoid setting yourself up for failure with unrealistic goals. After all, Rome wasn’t built in a day. The most successful projects are realised through a succession of manageable goals, which leave you positioned to make larger changes. Don’t try to run before you can walk. Which brings us onto our next point…

Break it down

Your goal may have a lot of complex components. If so, break it down into manageable steps. Set a clear plan with clearly defined stages and milestones, and focus on one step at a time. This will help you track your progress, adapt to any changes, and prevent your team becoming overwhelmed. It also means you can celebrate each milestone along the way, helping to keep everyone’s enthusiasm stoked up.

New Year’s resolutions for businesses 

So, which New Year’s resolutions should you make to enjoy business success in 2020? Here are six of our favourites.

1. Make time for yourself

When you run a business, it’s hard to prioritise yourself. Many small business owners feel overwhelmed by trying to do ALL. OF. THE. THINGS. And, when it comes to a choice between personal time and work, the former always loses out. However, as any mental health professional will tell you, an unhealthy work-life balance will eventually take its toll. If you don’t make time to rest and recharge, your energy levels, productivity, and health will suffer in the long term. Stephen Covey once said, “don’t prioritise your schedule, schedule your priorities”, and that’s what you need to do. Prioritise “you” time by writing it into your schedule. Make YOU the priority, because if you don’t, no one else will.

2. Start a business blog

Anyone who tells you that blogging is dead is lying to you. Creating original content on a business blog remains a fantastic way to engage with consumers, build your brand, and grow your business. Blogging gives businesses the chance to share their expertise and passion, and showcase their products or services. What’s more, all that original content can be broken down and used in social media posts, email campaigns, and marketing material. It’s also a great way to improve your SEO and keep the Google bots happy.

3. Out with the old, in with the new

If something isn’t working, change it. Is there a piece of equipment that’s interfering with your productivity? Replace it. Likewise, if your business lacks a particular skill set, now is the time to address this. That may involve taking on a new employee, or buying in the expertise of an external company. It could even be that the information on your website, social media, or marketing material is tired and out of date, and no longer reflects your key business message. Indeed, many of our newest customers at Wordsmiths are small businesses who want to boost their brand by re-vamping their written content. Whatever you need to change, let 2020 be the year that you stop making do. The financial outlay will be worth every penny when you realise your business goals.

4. Be a community player

There is no better way to build goodwill for your business than giving back to your local community. Even if you run an online business with a far-flung customer base, there will be many organisations in your local community who could benefit from your help and support. That support could take the form of donating your products or expertise, or it may just be a simple matter of giving a little time and supporting fundraising drives. So, find a local group whose mission matters to you, and get stuck in.

5. Communicate more effectively

Through customer service, digital media, and keeping staff informed of new developments, effective communication underpins business success. Conversely, poor communication can undermine consumer confidence and damage your brand’s reputation. Just imagine how your business would be affected if you didn’t reply to customer queries, or had a website full of typos and outdated information. For things to run smoothly, all of your stakeholders – staff, consumers, and suppliers – need to receive the right information at the right time.

6. Delegate more things, more often

As we mentioned earlier, small business owners are often used to doing everything by themselves, but that leads to a negative work-life balance. Delegation – whether internal or outsourcing – is fundamental to restoring this balance. Admittedly, handing the reigns to someone else can be difficult, especially if you’re a micro-manager. But remember, delegation can benefit your business. It gives you the chance to focus on your areas of strength, as well as bringing in fresh ideas from other people. If you’re struggling to decide which tasks to delegate, ask yourself these questions:

  • Which tasks overwhelm you?
  • Are there any tasks that you dread?
  • Could any tasks be done more quickly by someone else?

The answers will give you clear picture of which jobs you should hand over.

And finally…

If your business New Year’s resolutions include outsourcing editing, updating your written digital content, or starting that business blog – contact Wordsmiths. We work with print and digital media, offering everything from a final check for accuracy to a comprehensive rewriting service. If you want to read more from us, follow Wordsmiths on Instagram and Facebook, or subscribe to via email to receive our latest news and blogs first.

How do I choose an editor (and what does an editor do?)

By | Deadlines, editing, Student advice | No Comments

Choosing an editor can be tricky. After all, you’re trusting them with your words and your hard-earned cash. You may be wondering if you even need an editor. People often ask us about what editors do, and how to choose one. So we want to answer those questions, and offer an insight into Wordsmiths’ editing service through the eyes of our customers.

Who uses your editing service?

In short, anyone who produces written content – from authors and charitable organisations, to students and website owners.

Why do your customers need an editor?

Some of our customers struggle with their word count or their deadlines.

“I had put so much work into my essay, but it was way over the word limit, and when I got ill, I knew I wouldn’t be able to edit it before the deadline. I was devastated because I’d worked so hard.” – Nadia, undergraduate law student.

“I had spent so much time on the designing of the book and the illustrations that I was in a rush to publish it. Customers were waiting eagerly to have the book.” – Shereen, author.

We also work with students who aren’t native English speakers. They are experts in their field, but their written English doesn’t always reflect their knowledge and expertise.

“I studied English for many years before I came here but when I write it is sometimes hard to explain my ideas in the best way. I wanted my research proposal to use the correct language” – Michael, postgraduate engineering student.

Our customers may need work on their writing style to make their content more effective. An external editor offers objectivity: writing is a creative process and it’s easier to edit effectively when you aren’t emotionally attached to the content.

“Our website looked great, the information was all there. But it didn’t really highlight our business philosophy and unique selling points. We needed a fresh set of eyes to re-vamp the written sections.” – Yusuf, small business owner.

What does an editor do?

Our editors comb through every aspect of written content. They consider overall structure, paragraph structure, content, clarity, style, and the use of citations.

Editors make improvements by:

  • Cutting out clutter.
  • Restructuring sentences and paragraphs.
  • Making words and sentences clearer, more precise, and more effective.
  • Proofreading to eliminate misspellings and mistakes in grammar and punctuation.

“The editor improved the language of my proposal, suggesting better words and phrases.” – Michael.

How do I choose an editor?

You understand what an editor does: now you need to find one. Here are some things to consider when choosing an editing service:

  • Website: A good editing service will have a professional-looking, well-written website. It should provide clear information on services and pricing, and give contact details.

“I didn’t know what editorial services other authors had used, so I did an online search and the one that caught my attention was Wordsmiths.” – Shereen.

  • Recommendations: There is no better endorsement than that of a satisfied customer. In fact, most of our first-time clients come to us via recommendations from previous customers.

“My colleague had used Wordsmiths and his experiences were very positive.” – Michael.

  • Customer service: A good editor will respond to your messages promptly. Communication matters – good editors are polite, approachable and professional, and happy to answer your questions fully.

“I got a fast response from Wordsmiths’ director. He was friendly, but thorough, and really took the time to understand what we needed. Once we placed our order, the work was returned to us on time, and we were really happy with it.” – Yusuf.

  • Transparency: Trustworthy editors will be happy to provide samples of their work. They should offer a free quote, making it clear what the quote includes (and what it doesn’t).

“We discussed my needs in detail via email, including my deadline. I got a free quote and I was happy with it.” – Nadia.

  • Qualifications and experience: The editor should be able to meet your individual needs, especially if your material covers a specialist subject, or has specific style requirements. After all, any competent editor can proofread, but not every editor has the skillset to edit a thesis on biotechnology. That’s why all Wordsmiths editors are graduates from UK universities. They have extensive knowledge and professional experience in fields such as law, healthcare, and finance. We allocate cases according to their specialism.

“Wordsmiths asked for details regarding my book content, and because it was an Islamic book, they directed me to a Muslim editor who worked on it.” – Shereen.

“In part of my essay I had used the wrong legal term. Because my editor was a law graduate, she noticed the mistake straight away…she didn’t just correct the problem, she explained it, and provided links to resources that helped me to better understand the terms” – Nadia.

How does your editing service benefit customers?

Editing helps clients to achieve their goals. Above all, we want to make our clients’ lives easier, allowing them to enjoy the success they deserve.

“Basically, the editing made us sound better!! The editing helped us to highlight our business philosophy and business identity which is a big part of what attracts our customers. I wasn’t sure if hiring an editor was worth the expense, but I now I know that the style of the words is just as important as the visuals.” – Yusuf.

“The editor asked questions about my proposal…I added new evidence and explained my method in more detail. My plan was much stronger.” – Michael.

“My essay got 65%…I just wouldn’t have been able to meet my deadline without hiring an editor. It removed all the stress I was feeling.” – Nadia.

How can I find out more?

If you want to know more about our editing services, or you have a specific piece of work that you’d like us to take a look at, we’re ready to help! You can contact us by email, chat direct via our website, or get in touch on our social media accounts at Facebook and Instagram.